Event

Tracking Comet NEOWISE

In July 2020, the Observatory provided observing guidance for the arrival of Comet Neowise, which definitely lived up to its billing.

EVENING SKY CHART for Comet NEOWISE

EVENING SKY CHART for Comet NEOWISE

MORNING SKY CHART for Comet NEOWISE

MORNING SKY CHART for Comet NEOWISE

Ephemeris data for NEOWISE (C/2020 F3)
Positions for 9:30 p.m., PST
Calculated for Los Angeles California by Starry Night/Carina Software. Magnitudes Seiichi Yoshida (analysis June 27)

Date 2020 Set Mag Az Alt RA Dec Constellation
July 13 9:55 PM 2 327.4° 2.1° 7h 29.2m 45° 50.0′ Lynx
July 14 10:16 PM 2.1 326.3° 4.2° 7h 46.2m 46° 45.9′ Lynx
July 15 10:37 PM 2.3 325.0° 6.5° 8h 4.7m 47° 28.8′ Lynx
July 16 10:58 PM 2.5 323.5° 8.7° 8h 24.6m 47° 56.7′ Lynx
July 17 11:16 PM 2.8 321.7° 11.0° 8h 45.5m 48° 7.5′ Ursa Major
July 18 11:33 PM 2.9 319.7° 13.2° 9h 7.1m 47° 59.9′ Ursa Major
July 19 11:46 PM 3.1 317.5° 15.4° 9h 29.0m 47° 33.0′ Ursa Major
July 20 11:57 PM 3.2 315.2° 17.5° 9h 50.7m 46° 47.1′ Ursa Major
July 21 12:05 AM 3.4 312.6° 19.5° 10h 11.7m 45° 43.2′ Ursa Major
July 22 12:11 AM 3.6 309.9° 21.4° 10h 31.8m 44° 23.3′ Ursa Major
July 23 12:15 AM 3.8 307.1° 23.1° 10h 50.6m 42° 49.7′ Ursa Major
July 24 12:17 AM 3.9 304.2° 24.7° 11h 8.2m 41° 5.2′ Ursa Major
July 25 12:18 AM 4.1 301.3° 26.0° 11h 24.3m 39° 12.8′ Ursa Major
July 26 12:19 AM 4.3 298.3° 27.2° 11h 39.0m 37° 15.0′ Ursa Major
July 27 12:18 AM 4.5 295.4° 28.1° 11h 52.4m 35° 14.3′ Ursa Major
July 28 12:17 AM 4.7 292.5° 28.9° 12h 4.6m 33° 12.9′ Ursa Major
July 29 12:16 AM 4.9 289.7° 29.4° 12h 15.7m 31° 12.3′ Coma Berenices
July 30 12:14 AM 5.1 287.0° 29.8° 12h 25.7m 29° 13.9′ Coma Berenices
July 31 12:12 AM 5.3 284.4° 30.0° 12h 34.9m 27° 18.8′ Coma Berenices
August 01 12:09 AM 5.5 282.0° 30.1° 12h 43.2m 25° 27.5′ Coma Berenices
August 02 12:07 AM 5.7 279.7° 30.0° 12h 50.8m 23° 40.5′ Coma Berenices
August 03 12:04 AM 5.9 277.6° 29.9° 12h 57.8m 21° 58.1′ Coma Berenices
August 04 12:01 AM 6.1 275.6° 29.6° 13h 4.2m 20° 20.5′ Coma Berenices
August 05 11:58 PM 6.3 273.8° 29.3° 13h 10.1m 18° 47.6′ Coma Berenices
August 06 11:55 PM 6.4 272.1° 28.8° 13h 15.5m 17° 19.3′ Coma Berenices
August 07 11:52 PM 6.6 270.6° 28.4° 13h 20.6m 15° 55.4′ Coma Berenices
August 08 11:49 PM 6.7 269.2° 27.8° 13h 25.2m 14° 35.9′ Coma Berenices
August 09 11:45 PM 6.9 268.0° 27.3° 13h 29.6m 13° 20.5′ Virgo
August 19 11:42 PM 7.1 266.8° 26.7° 13h 33.7m 12° 9.0′ Virgo
August 11 11:39 PM 7.2 265.8° 26.0° 13h 37.6m 11° 1.2′ Boˆtes
Augsut 12 11:35 PM 7.4 264.8° 25.4° 13h 41.2m 9° 56.9′ Boˆtes
August 13 11:32 PM 7.6 263.9° 24.7° 13h 44.6m 8° 55.8′ Boˆtes
August 14 11:29 PM 7.7 263.2° 24.0° 13h 47.8m 7° 57.7′ Boˆtes
August 15 11:25 PM 7.9 262.5° 23.3° 13h 50.9m 7° 2.5′ Virgo
Event
February 5, 2021
7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Online

All Space Considered – Remote

Griffith Observatory holds this public program online on the first Friday of every month. Join the Observatory's curatorial staff as they examine and explain the most-talked-about subjects in astronomy and space science.

All Space Considered

Upcoming All Space Considered

Griffith Observatory holds this public program online on the first Friday of every month. Join the Observatory’s curatorial staff as they examine and explain the most-talked-about subjects in astronomy and space science. For more information, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

Topics this month include the following.

Celebrating Tony Cook

This is Your Life: Tony Cook
Celebrating Tony Cook

Watch Now

 

The Golden Griffy Nominations

The Superbowl of Astronomy:
The Golden Griffy Nominations

Apollo 14: 50th Anniversary

Remembering Apollo 14
Apollo 14: 50th Anniversary

Watch Now

Juno & InSight Missions Extended

Juno & InSight Missions Extended, but the Mole is No More

Watch Now

Sky Report

Sky Report

Watch Now

Pretty Pictures

Pretty Pictures

Event
February 17, 2021
7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Online

Prep for Perseverance

Member Exclusive

The night before Perseverance is scheduled to land on Mars, Friends Of The Observatory will gather online to get the inside scoop form the experts and astronomers of Griffith Observatory.

Event
March 5, 2021
7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Online

All Space Considered – Remote

Griffith Observatory holds this public program online on the first Friday of every month. Join the Observatory's curatorial staff as they examine and explain the most-talked-about subjects in astronomy and space science.

All Space Considered

Upcoming All Space Considered

Griffith Observatory holds this public program online on the first Friday of every month. Join the Observatory’s curatorial staff as they examine and explain the most-talked-about subjects in astronomy and space science. For more information, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

This Remote Event will be streamed live from are YouTube channel.

Topics this month include the following.

The Golden Griffith Awards

Top Stories from the AAS picked by you!
AKA, the Golden Griffith Awards

NASA JPL's Nagin Cox

Perseverance Q & A with NASA JPL’s Nagin Cox,

M2020 Perseverance Rover: Engineering Operations (EO)      Deputy Team Chief

Perseverance Q & A with NASA JPL's Nagin Cox

Sky Report

Pretty Pictures

Pretty Pictures with Katie

Event
March 20, 2021
12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Online

Spring Equinox – Local Noon

Join us at local noon to mark the start of Spring!

Upcoming Equinox and Solstice Events at Griffith Observatory

Spring Equinox - Local Noon

Griffith Observatory marks the start of spring in the Northern Hemisphere with a live online talk focused on the Sun as it reaches its highest point in the sky at local noon. Observatory staff will discuss the meaning of local noon and show how the Sun’s changing path across the sky causes seasonal changes.

Spring begins in Earth’s northern hemisphere at 2:37 a.m., PDT, today. Autumn begins in the southern hemisphere at the same time. The March/spring equinox is the moment when the Sun crosses the celestial equator (the projection of Earth’s equator into space) from south to north. From the spring equinox until the start of summer – the summer solstice in June – days will get longer, and the noon elevation of the Sun will increase. This happens because the Earth’s axis is tilted 23½ degrees to its orbit. Day and night are of equal length today.

Event
March 20, 2021
6:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Online

Spring Equinox – Sunset

Join us at sunset to mark the start of Spring!

Upcoming Equinox and Solstice Events at Griffith Observatory

Spring Equinox - Sunset

Griffith Observatory marks the start of spring in the Northern Hemisphere with a live online talk focused on the location of the setting Sun on the western horizon. Observatory staff will discuss the meaning of the equinox and how the Sun’s changing path across the sky causes seasonal changes.

Sunset on the spring equinox in 2014.

Spring begins in Earth’s northern hemisphere at 2:37 a.m., PDT, today. Autumn begins in the southern hemisphere at the same time. The March/spring equinox is the moment when the Sun crosses the celestial equator (the projection of Earth’s equator into space) from south to north. From the spring equinox until the start of summer – the summer solstice in June – days will get longer, and the noon elevation of the Sun will increase. This happens because the Earth’s axis is tilted 23½ degrees to its orbit. Day and night are of equal length today.

Event
April 2, 2021
7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Online

All Space Considered – Remote

Griffith Observatory holds this public program online on the first Friday of every month. Join the Observatory's curatorial staff as they examine and explain the most-talked-about subjects in astronomy and space science.

All Space Considered

Upcoming All Space Considered

Griffith Observatory holds this public program online on the first Friday of every month. Join the Observatory’s curatorial staff as they examine and explain the most-talked-about subjects in astronomy and space science. For more information, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

Topics this month include the following.

Event
May 7, 2021
7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Online

All Space Considered-Remote May 2021

Griffith Observatory holds this public program online on the first Friday of every month. Join the Observatory's curatorial staff as they examine and explain the most-talked-about subjects in astronomy and space science.

All Space Considered

Upcoming All Space Considered

Griffith Observatory holds this public program online on the first Friday of every month. Join the Observatory’s curatorial staff as they examine and explain the most-talked-about subjects in astronomy and space science. For more information, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

Topics this month include the following.

Event
May 26, 2021
1:45 a.m. – 6:00 a.m.
Online

Lunar Eclipse Online Broadcast May 26, 2021

Total lunar eclipse from Los Angeles, May 26, 2021. Live broadcast from Griffith Observatory.

Upcoming Eclipse Events at Griffith Observatory

Early in the morning on Wednesday, May 26, 2021, there will be a total Lunar Eclipse observed from Los Angeles, CA.

Griffith Observatory is hosting an online broadcast of the total lunar eclipse that morning from 1:45 a.m. – 6:00 a.m., PDT. Griffith Observatory is NOT having an onsite public viewing event. Griffith Park will NOT be open during the broadcast. The Observatory will stream the eclipse live online, weather permitting. Watch here

Event/Eclipse Timeline

1:45 a.m. Online broadcast begins
2:45 a.m. Umbral eclipse begins (first visible bite out of the Moon)
4:11 a.m. Totality begins (Moon totally covered in shadow)
4:19 a.m. Maximum eclipse
4:26 a.m. Totality ends (Moon emerges from shadow)
5:45 a.m. Sun rises in the east-northeast
5:52 a.m. Umbral eclipse ends
5:53 a.m. Moon sets in the west-southwest
(NOTE: The Moon may set a little earlier due to the local horizon.)
6:00 a.m. Online broadcast ends

What is a Lunar Eclipse?

A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes completely into the shadow cast by the Earth. The round disk of the full Moon slowly moves into the dark shadow, and the bright Moon grows dim. The Moon does not, however, become completely dark. Instead, it usually glows with a faint copper or red color, a result of sunlight being filtered and bent through the Earth’s atmosphere (much like a sunset). The lunar eclipse is visible throughout southern California and can be seen easily with the unaided eye, though telescopes or binoculars may enhance the view.

The next total lunar eclipse visible in Los Angeles will occur on May 15-16, 2022

To learn more about eclipses, please visit our eclipse info page

Advice for Viewing

If skies are clear, the eclipse will be visible to the unaided eye from anywhere in southern California. It is safe to view a lunar eclipse without any eye protection. You do not need a telescope to see a lunar eclipse. Just go outside and look up to the southwest.

Timeline for Eclipse

Lunar Eclipse Animation